Breast Pumping

In planning to go back to work, think about your breastfeeding goals. The more breast milk your baby gets, the better. But breastfeeding does not have to be all or nothing, here are some different options to consider:

  • Breastfeed. This could mean going to your baby for feedings or having your baby brought to you. Some mothers keep their babies with them at work or use reverse cycle nursing. This means breastfeeding often at home and working during their baby’s longest sleep stretch.
  • Breastfeed when you are with your baby and pump your milk for all missed feedings. One thing to remember is that if you miss feedings and don’t pump to make up for the missed feeding, your milk supply will decrease over time, leaving you with less breast milk to give your baby.
  • Leave both pumped milk and formula for missed feedings. 
  • Leave formula for missed feedings and breastfeed when together. Also think about finding a caregiver close to work rather than home. Keeping your baby close can reduce travel time, time apart, and your need to pump.

Also think about finding a caregiver close to work rather than home. Keeping your baby close can reduce travel time, time apart, and your need to pump.


This is general information and does not replace the advice of your healthcare provider. If you have a problem you cannot solve quickly, seek help right away. Every baby is different. If in doubt, contact your physician or healthcare provider.